Alice Babette Toklas was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early 20th century. I laughed at Alice's unexpected explanation of her first murder in "Murder in the Kitchen" and about Aunt Pauline and Lady Godiva. The recipes are basically impossible, but that's immaterial. There is nothing like reading a history or biography book and being so completely transported to another time and place that you find... Toklas's rich mixture of menus and memories of meals shared with such famous friends as Wilder, Picasso, and Hemingway, originally published in 1954. It's very personal and it covers the art of french entertaining. June 1st 1998 shipping: + $10.00 shipping . It is more memoir than cookbook. The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book, however, is her true memoir: a collection of traditional French recipes that predates Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Kalouga: heat up sugar and butter. The parts about the wars are very good, and I marked many recipes of interest.

Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 25, 2019. Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wilder, Matisse, and Picasso shared meals at the home she kept with Gertrude Stein, who famously memorialized her in The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. (These last descriptions of her garden are particularly lush and pleasing.)

Though the proce. Take half a pound of butter, add a cup of cream. Yay! She is memorialized in Stein's most famous book, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 30, 2014. And remembered that just about all of a butchered animal was eaten in one form of another. “Godiva was tired and old and Gertrude Stein in spring bought a new car...”, See 1 question about The Alice B. Toklas Cookbook…, Readers’ Top Histories and Biographies of the Last 5 Years. Unable to add item to List. Alice B and her life partner Gertrude travel around Europe in Wartime, visiting the rich and famous and eating at fab restaurants.

Be warned. This book talks about their life together and intersperses it with recipes. This sums up pretty much all the recipes in this interesting cookbook cum memoir by Alice B" Toklas. This was the most charming find ever. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas Illustrated (Hardback or Cased Book) The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book, however, is her true memoir: a collection of traditional French recipes that predates Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. I also long to make a Custard Josephine Baker just so I can call it such. But even during the wars, her anecdotes are from the perspective of living under the privations imposed by Germany and saving up for the celebration she knew would be coming when France was finally liberated. I love this book and it's brilliant author. Pitiful. Such wealth. This book captures the kind of people who went to Paris and how they lived during the Twenties. Please try again. The recipes enter as digressions in particular memories of dinner parties, picnics, and outings. It will mean adding even more useless bottles of liqueurs to my already overstocked bar.

Found this in a neighborhood Wee Free Library box. First, ignore the snarky introduction by M.F.K.

A great find. Toklas and Stein frequently had cook/housekeepers to do much of the cooking. I love the form of this cookbook as her reminiscences about living in Paris and the French countryside during two world wars are punctuated by recipes to illustrate visits she had, people she met, or routines she upheld.

Nevertheless, the book is a treasure, and I refer to it quite often, simply for her eccentric wit, and her enchanting stories of adventures with Ms. Stein and the Lost Generation. When they traveled, Alice made sure in advance that the meals would be to Gertrude's satisfaction. Welcome back.

“A book of character, fine food and tasty human observation." Mutton, wild boar, pigeon, rabbit, duck...as well as shellfish and fresh water and saltwater fishes. A pleasant read to pick up and put down at will because it is divided into great little anecdotes and sections.

Alice B. Toklas, writer Gertrude Stein's life partner, wrote the book to make up for her unwillingness at the time to write her memoirs, in deference to Stein's 1933 book, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. I liked reading the stories in this cookbook. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book, however, is her true memoir: a collection of traditional French recipes that predates Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Not cool and untrue. Toklas recollects her life with Gertrude Stein through food. This really is a cookbook, laden with recipes. I bought this as a gift some of the recipes are amazing. I have a lot of food allergies, so I read cookbooks more for the entertainment value than for the useful knowledge. No matter--it must be done. Living in France in the twenties and thirties meant eating classical cuisine and Alice both supervised the series of cooks who worked in their household or she did the cooking herself. Toklas supplies familiar recipes such as coq au vin, bouillabaisse, and boeuf bourguignon, along with what is perhaps the earliest instructions for haschich fudge (“which anyone could whip up on a rainy day"), and she entertains with fascinating memories of Paris—Toklas' home for most of her life—and of rural France, Spain, and America. What a fun romp ! It was the literary bargain of the year for me. I think it's a perfect supplement to Julia Child's Master the Art of French Cooking. PB 1960 Vintage GOOD con Picasso cover. There are also a bunch of stories from Occupied France, and this image of these ex-pats flowing across the country from place to place, hoarding and swapping food. Brioche: put in ALL THE EGGS and then some flour. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. At times, very clever and entertaining. (ISBN: 9781897959190) from Amazon's Book Store.

I found a paperback copy of the cookbook in Asheville NC for $1.72 plus tax. The chapter on servants is like cocktail quips tossed off without the benefit of cocktails or facial expression. The descriptions of the food are incredible--both because of the elaborate nature of many of the dishes, the copious inclusion of cream and butter, and because of Toklas's delicious and funny asides even within some of the recipes. It's so funny how bold she is about how good the recipes are. I enjoyed this, especially the last section on the vegetable gardens at Bilignin. In the recipe, Toklas says it is called "the food of paradise" and goes on to suggest places where the cook might find the cannabis. I laughed at Alice's unexpected explanation of her first murder in "Murder in the Kitchen" and about Aunt Pauline and Lady Godiva. This is not the hard-cover, ergo no introduction by MFK Fisher. Not cool and untrue. Alice B. Toklas Cook Book Anchor Book ed. When she wrote about something she cared about -- her own cooking or gardening -- she was passionately present. First, ignore the snarky introduction by M.F.K. I guess I need to read her autobiography. A kilo of butter! Apparently Gertrude Stein enjoyed eating very well, and it was Alice B. Toklas who made sure that she did.

My favorite recipe is "Godmother's Chicken", which also is inexact. The most famous culinary experiment is a concoction called "Hashish Fudge". Toklas and Stein frequently had cook/housekeepers to do much of the cooking so this was not such a problem for them. Free shipping . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. But, the recipes are presented in a similar fashion to Fisher's, i.e., there's a story and some follow-up opinions around each of her recipes.

", Although Toklas later said that this recipe was given to her by her friend Brion Gysin, her name is forever linked with cannabis edibles due to its great success. That lone recipe appears in the appendix of recipes from her friends. The ingredients and amounts seem inexact for some dishes.